LPW Technology is delighted to have been awarded the Sharing in Growth (SiG) ‘Ikigai’ trophy, the top award at the SiG ALL STARS showcase event. Ikigai is a Japanese phrase meaning ‘reason to live’. Manufacturing metal powder exclusively for the rapidly-growing metal Additive Manufacturing sector, LPW has many reasons to look forward to strong growth in a sustainable, highly skilled environment.

As the manufacturing partner for Sanad Academy, the winner of the AED1million 2017 UAE Drones for Good prize, Immensa Technology Labs was faced with the task of redesigning and 3D printing the body of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) within a very short period of time. The decision to produce the drone using additive manufacturing was made only three weeks prior to the competition, at a time when the team at Sanad Academy realized that 3D printing was the only way by which they could realize their ambitious goals. Their aim was to manufacture a ‘lifeguard drone’ – a drone which did not only fly, but could also float on water and act as a lifebuoy for people who may be drowning.

Advances in manufacturing solutions include expansion of composite-compatible printers, Industry 4.0-ready systems with MTConnect, and production-level repeatability

Solutions include Carbon Fiber Filled Nylon 12 via Stratasys Direct Manufacturing and availability on two new production 3D printers.

Stratasys offers specialized high-repeatability solutions for aircraft interiors and other highly regulated production applications

Stratasys 3D printers and materials provide extremely high levels of strength, durability and thermal properties to power missions to deep space

Variant of new Stratasys Antero™ 800NA, PEKK-based material offers electro-static dissipative (ESD) functionality for advanced mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties

New material allows aerospace and other high-performance vehicle makers to move to additive manufacturing for high-temperature, chemical-exposed parts

Stratasys (Nasdaq:SSYS), a global leader in applied additive technology solutions, today introduced for its FDM process, a new PEKK-based high-performance thermoplastic, called Antero™ 800NA.

Emirates has announced that it has used cutting-edge 3D printing technology to manufacture components for its aircraft cabins. The airline has reached a significant milestone in innovation by using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), a new and innovative 3D printing technique to produce video monitor shrouds. One of the other recent achievements has been the 3D printing, certification and installation of aircraft cabin air vent grills for onboard trials.

• 3DEXPERIENCE platform will support digital transformation of CASC and China’s industries to enhance innovation for “Made in China 2025”

• Deeper Dassault Systèmes footprint in China supports French, Chinese commitment to industrial transformation
• Dassault Systèmes also named founding member of France-China Business Council

Flow measurement probes from Vectoflow – robust thanks to additive manufacturing and EOS

Flow measurement probes are the components responsible for gauging the speed and angle of attack of an airflow and are used in particular in aircraft and turbo-machinery design. The speed and angle of attack are determined from the inflowing air. While they may seem relatively small and fragile, these systems have to withstand extreme stresses and continue to function reliably at all times. Vectoflow specialises in developing and manufacturing complex flow measurement probes. It uses EOS additive manufacturing technology to achieve an ideal design with maximum endurance.

Antenna bracket for RUAG's Sentinel satellite - certified for deployment in outer space

For many people, talking of the infinite vastness of the universe conjures up stories of science fiction, usually told by a Hollywood film studio. However, in real life, more than in any other area, it is arguably in space travel that a strong will and clear vision are vital for creating the necessary technology and readying it for deployment in the cosmos. This was the challenge faced by Swiss technology group RUAG in the construction of its Sentinel satellite, designed for observing our planet from on high. Even here, beyond the Earth's atmosphere, additive manufacturing is playing a key role.

Components cut from 248 to 1 with EOS Technology

„Mission Critical“ perfectly describes the Class 1 components used in the aerospace industry. Missions costing hundreds of millions depend on these components. Accordingly, engineers are constantly seeking to develop components of the highest quality, functionality, and robustness while simplifying the manufacturing chain and reducing the number of individual elements. Thanks to EOS technology, ArianeGroup has succeeded in taking this to a whole new level: Instead of 248 elements, the injector head of a rocket engine of a future upper stage propulsion module now counts just one component. The injector head has been simplified and reduced to what is literally an all-in-one (AiO) design.

Today, the dream of flight revolves around producing aircraft components using industrial 3D printing technology. Every company aims to open up opportunities to differentiate themselves in the marketplace – in terms of new customer benefits, potential cost savings and sustainability targets. Thanks to EOS additive manufacturing technology, Liebherr is getting closer to achieving this goal. The realization of a high-pressure hydraulic valve block using EOS metal 3D printing technology marks an important milestone. This valve block has now been successfully tested on a flight with an Airbus A380 aircraft.

Stratasys Ltd. (Nasdaq:SSYS) supported a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket, launched yesterday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Atlas V rocket flew serial production 3D printed parts enabled by Stratasys support and technology. The 3D printed parts highlight the ability to replace metal components with 3D printed lightweight thermoplastic components.